Dr Olaniyan D.A.


 

 

 

 

 

David Akinola Olaniyan,

Academic and Professional Qualifications B.Ed, M.Ed., Ph.D (Ib.)

Senior Lecturer

Area of Specialisation

  Download CV

 Office

Department of Educational Management,

University of Ibadan, Ibadan,

Tel:

Contact:   

I        Research

(a)    Completed

The following are the completed research works conceptualized, designed and carried out by me and other colleagues.

1.     Functional Literacy and Women Development in Nigerian – self funded.

     In the present crisis of the world system which has increased inequalities between nations and within nations as well as between women and men, the most fundamental and underlying principle of women development should be that of structural transformation.  A nation should challenge the economics, political and cultural forms of domination which are found at the international, national and house-hold levels.

The paper attempted to understand and discuss the position of women as regards their education in relation to development and a conviction that women should play a decisive role in changing world development.  (Publication 14.)

 

2.     Human Capital Theory: Implications for Educational Development.

          Co – Researcher, Okemakinde, T. University of Ibadan, Ibadan.

     The belief that education is an engine of growth rests on the quality and quantity of education in any country.  The study posits that formal education is highly instrumental and even necessary to improve the production capacity of a nation and discusses the rationality behind investment in human capital.  Empirical evidences of human capital model were identified and findings reveal that investment in education has positive correlation with economic growth and development.  Criteria for the applicability and problems associated with the theory were identified and implications for educational development highlighted.  Conclusively, the study recommends that for education to contribute significantly to economic growth and development, it must be of high quality to meet the skill-demand needs of the economy.  (Publication 23.)

 

 

 

3.     Supervision in Organization: An Overview Self – Funded.

     There is today an apparent need for supervision in modern complex organizations.  The need has created attention on the strategic nature of supervision useable in education, business and industry.  The goals of organization are accomplished by the collection of people whose efforts and behaviours are planned, organized, selected, coordinated, integrated and supervised in order to attain the set predetermined objectives.  It is now being suspected that supervision is needed the heart of modern organizations.  In other words, the effectiveness of supervision is a function of organization development.  This paper attempts to examine the concept, strategic nature, processes / elements.  Functions and implications of supervision on organization development. It is concluded that supervisor should persist in discussing the objectives, policies and procedure that the organization has until the subordinates are able to understand and believe in them. (Publication 16.)

 

4.    A Critical Review of Management of Primary Education in Nigeria: 

Co – Researcher, Dr. Obadara E.O Tai Solarin University of Education, Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State

     Primary education is a foundational level of education that needs to be well funded, controlled and managed.  Adequate provisions of education to the citizens contribute greatly to the socioeconomic development of the country.  Therefore good administration of primary level of education is required to foster national growth and development.  The paper thus examined the management of primary education in Nigeria form the colonial administration to date.  It is therefore observed that the management of this level of education has passed through different stages and different authorities exercised its control from time to time.  It is being faced with many problems ranging form acute shortage of classroom spaces or over-crowded classrooms, shortage of teachers and equipment to under-funding.  (Publication 30.)

 

5.     Globalization and Nigeria Educational System: Opportunities and Challenges

Co – Researcher, Dr. Obadara E.O Tai Solarin University of Education, Ijebu – Ode, Ogun State.

     The social, political, economic and technological changes in the world today (globalization) have revolutionized education, calling for radical changes to meet the current demands of the society.  Internet is a window to the world; it opens a vast store of information and communications.  Connectivity has become important as building a new school for community advancement.  This paper therefore discusses the challenges and opportunities of globalization through application of information and communication technologies to Nigerian Education system.  It is concluded that schools and universities should integrate new technologies into their teaching methods.  Teachers and students also should learn how to use and integrate the new technologies and they should be encouraged to develop curiosity in them.  (Publication 20.)

 

6.     Women`s Participation in Industrial Unions in Nigeria.

        Co-Researcher, Dr Olaniyan, A.A. The Polytechnic, Ibadan, Oyo State.

This paper examines the women’s participation in industrial unions in Nigeria. This study was carried out using the survey research design. The population of this study consisted of twenty-six (26) industrial unions, out of which a random sample sixe of ten (10) was taken. The purposive sampling technique was employed to select the subjects as to cover women members randomly chosen. Women’s participation in industrial unions in Nigeria, questionnaire were administered on the subjects including oral interview to supplement the questionnaire. Data obtained were analyzed using t-test and analysis of variance. The results indicate that, women that are senior staff in the selected unions – participated more than women that are junior staff in industrial unions, it is also observed that there is no significant difference between the level of participation of women in leadership positions and those who are not in leadership position. It was recommended that trade unions must adopt the ICFTU’s and ILO’s approach of setting a minimum 30 percent female participation at all levels of their activities. A policy should be adopted to encourage positive actions on women participation. (Publication 35)

 

7.     Staff Training and Development: A Vital Tool for Organizational Effectiveness.

Co – Researcher, Dr. Ojo, L.B Yaba College of Technology, Yaba, Lagos State.

     The need for improved productivity has become universally accepted and that it depends on efficient and effective training is not less apparent.  It has further become necessary in view of advancement in modern world to invest in training.  Thus the role played by staff training and development can no longer be over-emphasized.  Staff training and development are based on the premise that staff skills need to be improved for organizations to grow.  Training is a systematic development of knowledge, skills and attitudes required by employees to perform adequately on a given task or job.  New entrants into organizations have various skills, though not all are relevant to organizational needs.  Training and development are required for staff to enable them work towards taking the organization to its expected destination.  It is against the backdrop of the relative importance of staff training and development in relation to organization effectiveness that this paper addressed.  (Publication 25.)

 

8.     Challenges Against Implementation of Introductory Technology Curriculum in Nigerian Junior Secondary Schools.

Co – Researcher, Dr. Ojo, L.B Yaba College of Technology, Yaba, Lagos State.

     This study examined challenges against implementation of introductory technology curriculum in Nigeria Junior Secondary School.  It employed the use of survey research method and One Hundred and Twenty-Five (125) teachers were randomly selected across the state out of One Thousand and Four Hundred and Twenty- Five (1525) population.  A self structured liker type questionnaire contrary 25 items was employed.  While Arithmetic mean was the major statistical tool used for data analysis.  A co-efficient of 0.88 was obtained for the instrument using Kuder Richardson formula (KR-1).  The results showed that poor funding, lack of tools and equipment unavailability of instructional materials and nonchalant attitude of government are some of the challenges facing the successful implementation of introductory technology curriculum.  The study recommended that well equipped work shop as well as introductory materials should be provided to enhance teaching and learning of introductory technology.  (Publication 27.)

 

9.     Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Implications for Educational Development in Nigeria.

Co – Researcher, Okemakinde, T. University of Ibadan, Ibadan

     This paper examines the Information Technology (IT) potentials for educational development in Nigeria, such as providing the medium for cultural transmission, skill acquisition, and preparation for working life and so on.  It reviews the trend of IT and Nigerian educational system by highlighting the complex managerial problems being faced in educational institutions due to paucity of information as well as poor capacity for information management.  The value and the relevance of IT to educational development are discussed and emphasis was placed on the fact that for Nigerian educational institutions to compete in the rapidly-evolving world of technology, remaining up-to-date with basic information system is mandatory.  The article concludes by suggesting that the curricula of Nigerian educational system need radical overhaul to make it Information Technology-focused and friendly to be able to fare favourably well with those of developed nations.  (Publication 19.)

 

 

10.    The Challenges of Human Capital Flight to Educational Development in Africa.

Co – Researcher, Dr. Obadara, O.E. Tai-Solarin University of Education, Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State.

     Human capital flight is usually thought of as causing harmful effects for the source country.  Due to emigration, a country loses human capital and, hence parts of its productive capacity.  Extenuating these harmful effects, emigration often times creates the opportunity for the source country to receive remittances.  They have become a crucial source of finance capital for many developing countries.  This paper is not about human capital flows in its generality.  Rather it narrowly focuses on the high skill content of African emigration to industrial countries, and its challenges to educational growth and development in the region.  The strategies to reverse brain drain and the recommendations on how to successfully deal with this problem were proffered.  (Publication 26.)

 


 (b)   In Progress

The following are the on-going research work carried out by me in conjunction with colleagues and postgraduate students.

 

1.  Human Resources Development for Sustainable Educational Development: Self – Funding.

     A survey of organizational behaviour of personnel in Educational system in Nigeria with international relationship focusing in the areas of productivity, job satisfaction, organizational goal setting and achievement.

 

  1. Human Resources Development and Preservation: Implications for Educational Development in Nigeria. 

Co – Researcher, G.D. Opinmi University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

Human resources constitute the hub of development and growth in the life of a nation.  The dignity and pride of a nation depends on her human resources that are well – developed and preserved.  And the quality of human resources developed hangs on the quality and standard of education being dispensed in a nation.  A conscious and concerted effort to develop as a nation must be tailored to the strong desire to develop her educational system; because every developmental programme must take its root from education as the spring board.  It is in view of this that, this research will make a microscopic look at the issue of human resources development and preservation as the basis for educational development in Nigeria.

        As it is often said that no nation can develop beyond her level of education, it becomes highly pertinent to cross-examine how the human resources in the education sector are being developed and preserved.

In view of the fact that human resources are indispensable in any development programme especially in the education sector, the research will highlight the significance of human resources development and preservation and also suggested means of curbing the problems of brain-drain.

          3.   Impact of Teacher Education on Wealth Creation and Employment in Nigeria

     Co – Researcher, Okemakinde T. University of Ibadan, Ibadan

    This research will examine the role of teacher education on employment and wealth creation.  It is established that teacher education affords man an all-round development and it enables man to better his lot and society.  Education makes it possible for Nigerians to vie favourably with other nations of the world for well paid employment.  Also, it is discovered that education holds the ace to gainful employment, sustainable economic growth and national development, hence the importance of teacher education in upholding all these cannot be over- emphasized.  Problems confronting teacher education in achieving its stated objectives will be discussed.  Thus, how employment enables individuals that are educated to liberate themselves from the shackle and manacle of poverty and ignorance via teacher education is the pivot of this research.

  1. 4.   The Influence of Perceived Leadership Styles on Secondary School Teachers’ Job Satisfaction In Lagos State.

Co – Researcher, Dr. Obadara E.O. Tai Solarin University of Education, Ijebu-Ode, Ogun State

Leadership is a very complex phenomenon; its research will continue to be a priority in the school setting, as it is in other organizations.  This paper therefore examines the influence of perceived principals; leadership styles on Secondary School teachers’ job satisfaction in Lagos State.  The sample of 250 public secondary school principals (135 male and 115 female) out of 595 principals in the state as at May 2008, and 2500 teachers was drawn for the study using proportionate stratified random sampling technique.  Two sets of self-constructed questionnaire tagged Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) and Teachers’ Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (TJSQ) with a reliability coefficient (r) of 0.82 and 0.78 respectively were used for data gathering.  The inferential statistic of multiple regression was used for the analysis, while the null hypotheses generated for the study were tested at .05 level of significance.  The findings revealed that the perceived principals’ leadership styles significantly influenced teachers’ job satisfaction.  While principals’ age and sex each influenced the leadership style(s) they adopt in managing the school with age as the most potent influence on the principal’s leadership style.  Also the teachers’ demographic variables influence teachers’ level of satisfaction while age has the most potent influence on teachers’ followed by teachers’ years of experience, level of education, and sex in that order.  Finally, some recommendations were made to encourage teachers’ satisfaction with their job in other to achieve educational goals. 

(c)    Dissertation and Thesis

(i)     Olaniyan, D.A. (1989) Staff Management Relations In Banking Industry: A Case study of Owena Bank, Akure, Ondo State. Unpublished M.Ed  project, University of Ibadan.  Ibadan Pages 98.

(ii)    Olaniyan, D.A. (1992) Staff Management Relations As a Factor in the Job Performance of Non-Academic Staff in Colleges of Education in Oyo and Osun States. Unpublished Ph.D Thesis, University of Ibadan. Ibadan Pages 142.

        Publications

        (a)    Books already published:

(b)    Chapters in Books already published:

*1.    Akinwumiju, J.A. and Olaniyan D.A. (1996): Supervision, Leadership and Administration: The Evasive Concepts in School Management (In S.O. Ayodele (Ed). Education in the Service of Humanity. Ibadan Institute of Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Pages 105-117. Contribution: 50% Nigeria.

 

*2.    Olaniyan, D.A. (1998): Monitoring School Effectiveness in Educational System: A Modern Approach. In A. Abimbade (Ed.),  Teacher Preparation: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century. Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan, Pages 174 – 182. Nigeria. 

 

*3.    Farombi, J.G and Olaniyan, D.A. (1999): The Montessori Method of Teaching and Students’ Academic Performance. In D.A. Olaniyan (Ed) Development issues in Africa. Ibadan, Department of Educational Management, University of Ibadan, Contribution: 50% Nigeria. 

 

*4.    Olaniyan, D.A. and Okemakinde, T. (2003): Management of Students’ Crises in Nigeria’s Higher Institutions: Implications for Educational Development in J.B. Babalola and S.O. Adedeji (Eds) Contemporary Issues in Educational Management. Ibadan, Department of Educational Management, University of Ibadan, Pages 145 – 160 Contribution: 70% Nigeria. 

(c)    Articles that have already appeared in Referred Conference

Proceedings.                -        Nil 

 (d)   Patents:               -       Nil

 

* Published / accepted since last promotion

 (e)   Articles That Have Already Appeared In Learned Journals

*5.    Olaniyan, D.A. (1990): Workers Participation in Decision Making: A Means Towards Job Performance. African Journal of Educational Management, Vol. 4, No. 1 & 2, 149-157. Nigeria.  

 

*6.    Olaniyan, D.A. and Olaniyan A.A. (1995): Towards Ideal Structure and Process of Nigeria Educational System. Journal of School Health Education Vol. 2 No. 1 & 2, 87-94.Contribution: 80% Nigeria.

 

*7.    Olaniyan D.A. (1996): Towards Good Staff Management Relations in Nigeria Educational System. Journal of Educational Theory and Practice, Vol. 2 No. 1 & 2, 97-104. Nigeria.

 

*8.    Olaniyan, D.A. (1997): Managing School Resources: A Participatory Approach, Journal of Special Education Vol. 7 No. 1, 47-57 Nigeria. 

 

*9.    Olaniyan, A.A and Olaniyan, D.A (1997) Funding of Students’ Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) Programmes at The Polytechnic, Ibadan. African Journal of Labour Studies, Vol. 3, No. 1, 86-101 Contribution: 50% Nigeria

 

*10.  Olaniyan, D.A. (1998): Employees Job Performance As Affected by Demographic Variables in Nigeria Educational System. African Journal of Educational Management. Vol. 5 No. 1, 71 – 78. Nigeria.

 

*11.  Olaniyan D.A. (1998): Governance of Schools: A Collective Responsibility. Journal of Special Education, Vol. 8 No 2, 21-28. Nigeria.       

 

*12.  Olaniyan D.A. (1999): Workers Participation in the Management of Higher Institutions in Nigeria. Journal of Nigerian Association of Education Administration and Planning. Vol. 1 No 1, 21-28. Nigeria. 

13.    Akintayo, M.O. and Olaniyan, D.A. (1999) Funding strategies for non-formal basic education. African Journal of Educational Management Vol. 7 No 1, 68- 80. Contribution: 50% Nigeria.

*      Published / accepted since last promotion

*14.  Olaniyan, D.A. (2000) Functional Literacy and Women Development, Nigerian.  Journal of Social Work Education, Vol. 4 No. 1, 99-104. Nigeria. 

 

*15.  Akinwumi, F.S and Olaniyan, D.A. (2001) Analysis of University Autonomy in Nigeria. African Journal of Educational Management Vol. 9. No 2, 117-129 Contribution: 50%.  .  Nigeria.

 

*16.  Olaniyan, D.A. (2001) Supervision in Organization: An Overview. Nigeria Journal of Social Work Education, Vol. 5. No. 1, 22-35 Nigeria. 

 

*17   Olaniyan, D.A. and Okemakinde, T (2002) Challenges of Unemployment Situation in Nigeria: Issues and Options. African Journal of Labour Studies. Vol. 5 No 1&2, 53-63.  Contribution: 80% Nigeria.

 

18.    Olaniyan, D.A and Obadara O.E. (2003) An Appraisal of Organizational Theory in its Total Ramifications. West African Journal of Physical and Health Education, Vol. 7. No 1, 253-263. Contribution: 70%. Nigeria. 

 

19.    Olaniyan, D.A. and Okemakinde, T. (2006) Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Implications for Educational Development in Nigeria. West African Journal of Physical And Health Education Vol. 10, 120-134 Contribution: 70% Nigeria.

 

20.    Olaniyan, D.A and Obadara, O.E (2006) Globalization and Nigeria Educational System: Opportunities and Challenges.  International Journal of African and American Studies,   Vol 5 No 2, 40-46.  Contribution: 80% USA

 

21.    Ojo, L.B. and Olaniyan, D.A. (2007) Instructional Materials as Determinants of Effective Teaching and Learning Process in Private Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria/. West African Journal of Physical And Health Education, Vol. 11, 142-154. Contribution: 50% Nigeria. 

*Published / accepted since last promotion

 

22.    Olaniyan, A. A. and Olaniyan, D. A. (2007) Perception of Women on Leadership Role in Industrial Unions in Nigeria. International Journal of Continuing and Non-Formal Education, Vol. 4 No.1, 63-75 Contribution: 50% Nigeria.

 

23.    Olaniyan, D.A. and Okemakinde, T. (2008) Human Capital Theory: Implications for Educational Development. Pakistan Journal of Social Sciences, Vol. 5 No5 Pages 479-483. Contribution: 70% Pakistan.

 

24.    Ojo, L.B and Olaniyan, D.A. (2008) Training and Development, Impact on the performance of Home Economics Teachers and School improvement in District II of School Division of Lagos State, Nigeria. Pakistan Journal of Social Sciences,     Vol. 5 No. 5, 484-488 Contribution: 50% Pakistan.

 

25.    Olaniyan D.A and Ojo, L.B (2008): Staff Training and Development: A Vital Tool for Organizational Effectiveness. European Journal of Scientific Research, Vol. 24 No. 3, 326-331.  Contribution: 80%. Austria.  

 

26.    Olaniyan, D.A. and Obadara, O.E. (2008), The Challenges of Human Capital Flight to Educational Development in Africa. East African Journal of Educational Research And Policy, Vol.2, 83 – 95. Contribution: 70% Uganda. 

 

27.      Olaniyan, D.A and Ojo, L.B (2008) Challenges Against Implementation of Introductory Technology Curriculum in Nigerian Junior Secondary Schools. European Journal of  Scientific Research Vol. 24, No. 1, 112-118.   Contribution: 70% Austria,

 

28.      Olaniyan, A. A. and Olaniyan, D. A. (2008) An Appraisal of Men Perception of Women Participation in Industrial Unions in Nigeria. Journal of Sociology And Education In Africa Vol. 7 No1, 191-201. Contribution: 50% Uganda.

*Published / accepted since last promotion

 


29.      Olaniyan, D. A. and Ojo, L.B. (2008) Principal Managerial Capacity As a factor of Teachers Productivity in Lagos State Public Secondary Schools.  African Journal of Educational Management, Vol. 11, 74-86 Contribution: 70% Nigeria.

 

30.      Olaniyan, D.A. and Obadara, E.O. (2008) A Critical Review of Management of Primary Education in Nigeria: International Journal of African and American Studies, Vol. 7. No. 1, 9-20 Contribution: 70% U.S.A.

 

31.      Ojo, L.B and Olaniyan, D.A (2008) Leadership Roles of School Administrators and Challenges ahead in post-Primary Institutions in Nigeria. European Journal of Scientific Research Vol 24. No 2, 172-178. Contribution: 50%. Austria.

 

32.      Olaniyan, D.A. and Obadara, E.O. (2008) Universal Basic Education and Sustainable Development in Nigeria. International Journal of Applied Psychology and Human Performance Vol. 4, 481 - 493 Contribution: 70% Ghana.

 

33.      Olaniyan, D.A. and Okemakinde, T. (2008) Impact of Teacher Education on Wealth Creation and Employment in Nigeria. West African Journal of Physical and Health Education. Vol. 12, 295-305 Contribution 70%. Nigeria

 

34.      Olaniyan, A. A. and Olaniyan, D. A. (March 31, 2009) Women’s    Participation in Industrial Unions in Nigeria.  Journal of Sociology and Education in Africa, Vol. 8.  No. 1, 167 – 178 Contribution: 50% Uganda.

 

35.      Obadara, O.E, and Olaniyan, D.A (April 30, 2009) Issues and Challenges in Funding of Higher Education In Nigeria and Ghana.  International Journal of Applied Psychology and Human Performance, Vol. 5.487 – 550 Contribution: 50% Ghana.

 

*Published / accepted since last promotion

 

36.      Olaniyan, D.A and Opinmi, G.D. (2009) Human Resources Development and Preservation: Implications for Educational Development in Nigeria. West African Journal of Physical and Health Education Vol. 13. 114 – 126 Contribution: 70 % Nigeria.

 

(f)  Books, Chapters In Books And Articles Accepted for publication.

 

37.    Obadara, O.E., and Olaniyan, D.A. (2008) Teachers Performance Incentives: A Panacea for Improving Teacher’s Productivity In Nigerian Secondary Schools. African Journal of Special Education. Contribution: 50% Cameroon.

 

38.      Olaniyan, D.A and Obadara, E.O. (May 31, 2009) Mentoring and Transformational Leadership Impetus for Supervisory Career Development.  African Journal of Special Education, Contribution 70% Cameroon

 

*Published / accepted since last promotion

 

XI      Major Conferences Attended with Papers Read (in the last 5 years)

 

1.     Nigerian Association for Educational Administration and Planning (NAEAP).  Annual Conference. 

Venue: University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Date:  28 – 31 October 2003.

Paper Read:  Management of Statutory and Non – statutory Records by Primary School Teachers.

 

2.     Nigerian Association for Educational Administration and Planning (NAEAP) Annual Conference.

        Venue:  University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria.

        Date:  10 – 13 October, 2005.

 

3.     Nigerian Association for Educational Administration and Planning (NAEAP) Annual Conference.

Venue:  Nnamdi  Azikiwe University Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Date:  22 – 26 September, 2009.

 

4.     Annual National Management Conference        of NIM

        Theme:  Managing the Post Petroleum Nigeria. The physical imperative.

        Venue:  International Conference, Abuja.

        Date: September 28 – 29, 2009.

Cons.